Thursday, May 26, 2011

Examine 1 in 7 Strokes Happens During Sleep

About 14 percent of strokes happen while people are sleeping, lowering the chance that they'll be able to get to the hospital in time for a potentially brain-saving treatment. Because the only treatment for ischemic stroke must be given within a few hours after the first symptoms begin, people who wake up with stroke symptoms often can't receive the treatment since we can't determine when the symptoms started. Imaging studies are being conducted now to help us develop better methods to identify which people are most likely to benefit from the treatment, even if symptoms started during the night.
Patients who suffered from ischemic strokes in a one-year period and were treated at emergency rooms in the Cincinnati area, Ischemic stroke is caused by blocked blood flow in the brain, usually because of a clot. In 14 percent of the cases, people woke up with symptoms of a stroke. Nationwide, that would account for 58,000 people who visit emergency rooms with stroke systems annually. People should not wait for any new neurological deficits in the morning to pass or go away as they become less groggy; they should seek medical attention immediately.

According to the National Stroke Association, symptoms of a stroke include:
  • Sudden paralysis or weakness in the face or limbs, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden problems with balance or walking
  • Sudden vision problems
  • Slurred speech
  • Sudden confusion or problems speaking or understanding simple statements
  • Sudden severe headache with no apparent cause
Stroke experts offer a simple way to help people remember what to look for if they think they are witnessing a stroke: Think FAST (Face, Arms, Speech, Time):
  • Face: See if the person is able to smile, or if one side of their face seems to droop.
  • Arms: Can the person raise both arms, or does one side drift downward?
  • Speech: See if the person is able to speak clearly or repeat a simple phrase.
  • Time: Call 9-1-1 immediately if the person exhibits any of these signs.
Even though tPA may not be an option in wake-up strokes, there are many other treatments that can be given in an emergency room or hospital.

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Health Tips to Spot caution Signs of Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood glucose, common among people with diabetes. It can occur even when you're trying hard to manage your blood sugar levels.

The Diabetes Association says while you can't always prevent hypoglycemia, you can take steps to treat it if you know the warning signs:
  • Sweating or turning pale.
  • Feeling dizzy or shaking.
  • Developing a headache.
  • Feeling hungry.
  • Showing moodiness, or rapid behavior changes.
  • Moving awkwardly or clumsily.
  • Having a seizure.
  • Acting confused, or having problems paying attention.
  • Having a tingly feeling around the mouth.

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Health Tips to prepare Diabetic Child for Insulin Shots

For a child with diabetes, blood glucose checks or insulin shots can be major sources of anxiety, especially at the beginning. Parents and caregivers may be no less fearful and guilt-stricken.

The health Association suggests how to help you and your child get through blood sugar checks and insulin shots:
  • Practice taking deep breaths, and letting them out slowly.
  • Tell your child a joke, or sing a favorite song during the shot.
  • Allow your child to play doctor and pretend to give you a shot first.
  • Ask your child to tell you about the favorite part of the day.
  • Prep the injection site with a kiss, and give another one when the shot is over.
  • Give the shot as quickly as possible.
  • Offer your child plenty of praise for being brave.

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Combating Myths on cyclic Allergies

With Spring Allergy season looming, people need to know the facts about controlling their allergies like Asthma and Immunology.

According to the ACAAI:
  • Over-the-counter (OTC) oral antihistamines are less effective than prescription medicines in controlling a stuffy nose. OTC antihistamines may control some allergy symptoms but have little effect on relieving a stuffy nose or inflammation that often occurs with allergies.
  • OTC decongestant nasal sprays are not addictive. However, overuse leads to the need to use more and more nasal spray in order to get congestion relief. Don't use an OTC decongestant nasal spray for more than three days in a row.
  • Eating local honey will not combat spring allergies.
  • Pollen allergies can lead to food allergies. About one-third of people with pollen allergies also may react to certain foods because some pollens and foods have similar proteins. The reaction is usually mild and may include itchy, tingling mouth, throat or lips.
  • Skin tests are more sensitive than blood tests for diagnosing allergies.
  • Allergy shots are not necessarily more costly or time-consuming than taking medicine to relieve allergy symptoms. Over time, in fact, they may reduce an allergic person's health-care costs.